So, while we have designed mymedicalimages to be as easy to use as possible, we know that sometimes you may need help or have questions. We’re guessing this is one of those times.

There’s a good chance that someone has needed our help related to your issue or has asked a similar question to yours. For this reason, we have published several frequently asked questions. Please take a few minutes and review our FAQs, and if we nailed it, great! If not, please feel free to contact us using the form below.

Top 5

Answer: No. There is currently no limit to the number of medical images that you can store on your mymedicalimages family account.

Answer: Your medical images are stored for as long as your account is active plus at least three years from the date your subscription expires.

Answer: Secure cloud services have rendered CDs an obsolete medium for storing information. We stopped sharing our personal photos on CDs years ago when we started using Flickr, Instagram and Facebook.

Answer: Yes, provided you have a personal or family account. Health care providers can only share images with someone who has a verified mymedicalimages account

Answer: Yes. We have provided a HIPAA compliance statement for more information

Support

FAQs

Answer: No. mymedicalimages only supports DICOM formatted images for upload. However, other image formats are supported when attaching photos or reports to your images.

Answer: You can check the folder on the CD or on your desktop that contains the images and is usually labeled. Unfortunately, every vendor does not burn images onto CDs in a way that makes it easy to know where the images are on the disk which may make it hard to know if every image was uploaded.

Answer: There are two ways to check. First, from the home page, tap the blue hamburger menu at the top right of the image preview for the images you are checking. From the dropdown menu, select Information. This will display information about each image you have uploaded and you can scroll down to see all of the JPEG formatted images. You can also select View from the dropdown and view see preview images for each image that was uploaded. These are DICOM formatted images.

Answer: There could be a number of reasons. If you are trying to load them from a CD, the disk could be damaged or corrupt. It could be that the images you are attempting to upload are not DICOM formatted. Please contact us to help further troubleshoot your problem.

Answer: We recommend that you DO NOT discard your CDs and that you KEEP them in a safe place.

Answer:You can only view, share and manage DICOM formatted images at this time.

Answer: This is likely due to buffering. You should see a small thin blue line beneath the image viewer and indicates the amount of buffering remaining.

Answer: There are a couple of reasons why you may be experiencing a delay in being able to load and view images. DICOM formatted images are very large in file size and require that you have the processing power (CPU) in the device you are using to view your images. Also, you need high speed internet access via a cellular connection or WiFi.

Answer: Yes. There are a few browsers that we don’t 100% support. They include Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Firefly. The browser we most support is Chrome.

Answer: Presently, we do not support Microsoft Internet Explorer. As a result, you may find that some functionality does not work properly. For optimal functionality we recommend changing your default internet browser to the latest version of Google’s Chrome or Apple’s Safari

Answer: Presently, we do not support Mozilla Firefox. As a result, you may find that some functionality does not work properly. For optimal functionality we recommend changing your default browser to the latest version of Google Chrome or Apple Safari.

Answer:Presently, we only support Google’s Chrome and Apple’s Safari internet browsers. As a result, you may find that some functionality does not work properly using other browsers. For optimal functionality we recommend changing your default browser to the latest version of Chrome or Safari.

Answer:This means that we detected an issue with an image or perhaps a non-DICOM formatted file was uploaded. Please follow the instructions on our troubleshooting page to start the process of correcting the issues you are experiencing with these images.

Answer: Medical images are much like your personal photos. They tell a story – a life’s story, yet HIPAA requires health care providers to retain your medical images for only six years from the date of its creation or the date when it last was in effect, whichever is later (your state may require longer retention). One day, your medical images may make a big difference in a diagnosis or treatment options by providing a baseline comparison to new images. Access to and shareability of your medical images enables you to easily seek second opinions.

Answer: Secure cloud services have rendered CDs an obsolete medium for storing information. We stopped sharing our personal photos on CDs years ago when we started using Flickr, Instagram and Facebook.

Answer:There is a considerable difference between using mymedicalimages and applications like Dropbox to view, share and manage all your family’s medical images. The biggest goes to mymedicalimages being developed solely for the purpose of allowing patients and health care providers to view, share and manage medical images. Dropbox is for storing and sharing files, not solely medical image files, and unlike mymedicalimages, Dropbox currently gives you 1TB of storage before charging as much as $19.99 per month. Dropbox does not provide a means for viewing DICOM formatted images, so you would need to find and download a DICOM viewer to view medical images stored on Dropbox. If you ever wanted to share your images with anyone, they would also need a DICOM viewer installed on their device and a willingness to join Dropbox. We’ve made it simple, and that’s because we know medical imaging and the need to share and view images at times of need and without the hassle of using multiple applications and expecting others with whom you are sharing to be troubled. Finally, with mymedicalimages you can have peace of mind knowing when and with whom you shared your medical images and when they viewed them.

Answer: While patient portals are good for accessing your medical image reports during the time you are being treated, most do not allow you to view your medical images, and you cannot share your patient portal access with providers outside of the facility’s network. That said, if you are able to access and download your medical images from a patient portal, great! Now you can upload them into mymedicalimages and manage, view and share them for a lifetime.

Answer: Your images are stored in the mymedicalimages cloud using Amazon Web Services (AWS). We do not delete images if you decide not to renew. In fact, you will still have the ability to view your medical images with an inactive account. You will not be able to share or upload images, however, if you do not renew your subscription.

Answer: No. There is currently no limit to the number of family members that you can manage on your mymedicalimages family account.

Answer: No. There is currently no limit to the number of medical images that you can store on your mymedicalimages family account.

Answer: Your medical images are stored for as long as your account is active plus at least three years from the date your subscription expires.

Answer: In order to save images share with you, you must have a mymedicalimages account and be signed in. Also, the person sharing their medical images with you must share them using the email account that you have registered with mymedicalimages.

Answer: Yes, provided you have a personal or family account. Health care providers can only share images with someone who has a verified mymedicalimages account

Answer:Should you find that you have shared your medical images with someone by mistake, you can disable their ability to view the images from Share History.

Answer: Answer There are two reasons why the recipient may not have been presented a save button while viewing the images you shared. First, the recipient must have an active account in order to save and be able to download shared images. Second, you must use the email address that the recipient verified when signing up for their account.

Answer: PACS (Picture Archive and Communications System) is a computer network for storing and displaying digitized radiologic images and reports.

Answer: DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) is the international standard to transmit, store, retrieve, print, process and display medical imaging information.

Answer: A study is a series of related medical images.

Answer: HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) is United States legislation that provides data privacy and security provisions for safeguarding medical information.

Answer: Yes. We have provided a HIPAA compliance statement for more information

Answer: There is personal information embedded into the medical image including your name, date of birth and any other information that the technician included while taking the image.

Answer: mymedicalimages is software as a service (SaaS), zero footprint, browser-based application which means there is nothing to download, not even an app. This provides us with much more flexibility to maintain an update the application than if we had to go through Apple or Google every time we wanted to fix a small bug or add a feature.

Answer: mymedicalimages supports any device that uses a Chrome or Safari web browser and that has access to the internet.

Answer: Send us your films, and we will digitize them and upload them to your mymedicalimages account for a small fee. Please contact us for more information on this service.

Answer: Yes. Be aware also that some medical images are very large in size. We recommend that you use WiFi when possible.

Answer: There are two types of second opinions – for diagnostic purposes and for treatment options. It is acceptable in some cases to use only the medical report, many times a medical specialist requires that you provided them with your medical images.